Archive for the ‘A Series of Tech.pinions’ Category

Spectrum: The Wheels of the FCC Grind Slowly

Remember back at CES in January when Federal communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski announced a plan to free 195 MHz of spectrum in the 5 gigahertz band for expanded Wi-Fi? I hope you we’re planning on using it anytime soon.

As …

by Steve Wildstrom   |   February 15th, 2013

Spectrum: Multiplication Beats Addition

Martin Cooper recalls the days of mobile radio-telephones before cellular service:

You’d have one station in a city and you could conduct in that city 12 phone calls at one time. During the busy hour, the probability of connecting, of getting …

by Steve Wildstrom   |   February 13th, 2013

Spectrum: Sharing Nicely Can Go a Long Way

Sharing has been part of U.S. spectrum policy from the beginning. When the government started handing out AM radio licenses in the 1920s and 30s, a relative handful of stations were assigned “clear channels” that they did not share with …

by Steve Wildstrom   |   February 6th, 2013

Spectrum: Where It Came From, Where It Goes

In the the beginning, wireless spectrum in the U.S. was free. In  1983, the Federal Communications Commission created the first analog cellular networks by assigning two chunks of airwaves in the 800 MHz band. One chunk was reserved for the …

by Steve Wildstrom   |   January 23rd, 2013
Dark Side of the Moon album cover

Spectrum: The Shortage Is a Crisis, but Not Serious

The late economist Herb Stein used to say that “if something cannot go on forever, it will stop.”

A profound economic truth lies behind that seeming flip statement. The world is forever on the verge of running out of vital commodities–oil, …

by Steve Wildstrom   |   January 16th, 2013
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Why Android Is Winning The Battles But Google Is Losing The War: Part 5

A Pyrrhic victory (/ˈpɪrɪk/) is a victory with such a devastating cost that it carries the implication that another such victory will ultimately lead to defeat. The phrase “Pyrrhic Victory” is named after King Pyrrhus of Epirus, whose army suffered …

by John Kirk   |   November 16th, 2012
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Why Android Is Winning The Battles But Google Is Losing The War: Part 4

A Pyrrhic victory (/ˈpɪrɪk/) is a victory with such a devastating cost that it carries the implication that another such victory will ultimately lead to defeat. The phrase “Pyrrhic Victory” is named after King Pyrrhus of Epirus, whose army suffered …

by John Kirk   |   November 15th, 2012
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Why Android Is Winning The Battles But Google Is Losing The War: Part 3

A Pyrrhic victory (/ˈpɪrɪk/) is a victory with such a devastating cost that it carries the implication that another such victory will ultimately lead to defeat. The phrase “Pyrrhic Victory” is named after King Pyrrhus of Epirus, whose army suffered …

by John Kirk   |   November 14th, 2012

Why Android Is Winning The Battles But Google Is Losing The War: Part 2

A Pyrrhic victory (/ˈpɪrɪk/) is a victory with such a devastating cost that it carries the implication that another such victory will ultimately lead to defeat. The phrase “Pyrrhic Victory” is named after King Pyrrhus of Epirus, whose army suffered …

by John Kirk   |   November 13th, 2012
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Why Android Is Winning The Battles But Google Is Losing The War: Part 1

A Pyrrhic victory (/ˈpɪrɪk/) is a victory with such a devastating cost that it carries the implication that another such victory will ultimately lead to defeat. The phrase “Pyrrhic Victory” is named after King Pyrrhus of Epirus, whose army suffered …

by John Kirk   |   November 12th, 2012